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Printshop Windows

A Peep at the New Installation Uniform, by Rowlandson ©

Satirical prints were usually purchased from printsellers’ shops. Some printsellers, such as Hannah Humphrey and William Holland, specialised in satirical prints. Many of these shops were near the royal residence of St James’s Palace where they were easily accessible to the courtiers who purchased such satires. Those who couldn’t afford to buy prints could admire the changing printsellers’ displays from the street. Arranged in rows in the panes of the printshop windows, these regularly changed to advertise the latest publications, and drew large crowds.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

A Peep at the New Installation Uniform.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

A Little Tighter.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

A runaway carriage

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

A Little Bigger.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

The Pillar of Salt.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

A lump of Innocence.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

First and Second Floor Lodgers.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

Dutch Merchants sketched at Amsterdam.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

Comedy Spectators.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

Tragedy Spectators.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

An Epicure.

Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827)

A lump of Impertinence !